Programa Sobre Edificios Sustentables TV-Pública

3 12 2010

En este programa compartimos: un informe acerca del funcionamiento de los edificios sustentables, un estudio realizado en Mar del Plata acerca de las paleocuevas y la historia del cambio climático, una investigación sobre las especies invasoras y el ganado en las yungas tucumanas; y presentamos un trabajo de diseño sustentable de bolsas y carros para ir al supermercado.





U.S. Offshore Wind Potential Four Times Total Power Generated

23 09 2010

GOLDEN, Colorado, September 14, 2010 (ENS) – The potential of offshore wind power in the United States to generate electricity is at least four times as great as the nation’s total electric generating capacity from all sources in 2008, finds a new assessment by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

In their technical report, Marc Schwartz, Donna Heimiller, Steve Haymes, and Walt Musial state, “Offshore wind resources have the potential to be a significant domestic renewable energy source for coastal electricity loads.”

Issued Friday, the NREL report presents the first draft of a national validated offshore wind resource database needed to understand the magnitude of the U.S. wind resource and to plan the distribution and development of future offshore wind power facilities. No offshore wind farms currently exist in the United States.

Wind availability and distribution is characterized by level of annual average wind speed, water depth, distance from shore, and state administrative areas.

The estimate does not describe actual planned offshore wind development, and the report does not consider that some offshore areas may be excluded from energy development on the basis of environmental, human use, or technical considerations.

The “Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States” shows that 4,150 gigawatts of potential maximum wind turbine capacity from offshore wind resources are available in the United States.

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, in 2008 the nation’s total electric generating capacity from all sources was 1,010 gigawatts.

The NREL report’s estimate is based on the latest high-resolution maps predicting annual average wind speeds, and shows the gross energy potential of offshore wind resources.

The potential electric generating capacity was calculated from the total offshore area within 50 nautical miles of shore, in areas where average annual wind speeds are at least 16 miles per hour at a height of 295 feet.

The research team assumed that five megawatts of wind turbines could be placed in every square kilometer of water that met these wind characteristics.

Detailed resource maps and tables for the offshore wind resources of 26 coastal states’ bordering the oceans and the Great Lakes break down the wind energy potential by wind speed, water depth, and distance from shore.

The offshore transformer station at the Lillgrund wind farm in the Oresund Sound between Malmo and Copenhagen converts the electricity produced by 48 turbines for use by 60,000 households supplied by the Swedish national grid. (Photo courtesy Siemens)

In May 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy released a report detailing a deployment scenario by which the United States could achieve 20 percent of its electric energy supply from wind energy.

Under this scenario, offshore wind was an essential contributor, providing 54 gigawatts of installed electric capacity to the grid.

“When President Obama took office in January 2009, his message clearly reinforced this challenge in a broader context of energy independence, environmental stewardship, and a strengthened economy based on clean renewable energy sources,” the authors state.

But many technical and economic challenges remain to be overcome to achieve the deployment levels described in the 20 percent wind report, the authors acknowledge.

“Many coastal areas in the United States have large electricity demand but have limited access to a high-quality land-based wind resource, and these areas are typically limited in their access to interstate grid transmission,” they say.

The new database will be periodically revised to reflect better wind resource estimates and to include updated information from other datasets. It is intended to serve as the foundation for future modifications that may include specific exclusion areas for the calculation of the nation’s offshore wind resource potential.

Offshore wind projects totaling more than 5,000 megawatts have been proposed and are in the planning or development stages in the United States and interest in offshore wind power development is growing among governments and also in the private sector.

On July 14, the American Wind Energy Association, AWEA, the national wind industry association, announced the formation of the Offshore Wind Development Coalition, called OffshoreWindDC. The new coalition will focus on advocacy and education efforts to promote offshore wind energy.

Founding members and contributors to the Offshore Wind Development Coalition include the corporations Apex Wind, Cape Wind, Deepwater Wind, Fishermen’s Energy, NRG Bluewater Wind, OffshoreMW, and Seawind Renewable.

Jim Lanard, president of OffshoreWindDC, said, “We are delighted to join with AWEA to advocate for policies that will support the development of this well-established technology. Our joint efforts will lead to job creation, significant economic development opportunities and environmental and energy security for our country.”

“The creation of this coalition demonstrates the growing interest in offshore wind energy in the U.S.,” said AWEA CEO Denise Bode. “Offshore wind provides a great opportunity to increase the use of renewable energy, thanks to the strong and steady winds that blow off our shores and proximity to electricity demand centers, particularly along the Eastern Seaboard and in the Great Lakes.”

The new coalition will join AWEA in working to secure long-term tax policy for offshore wind and shorten the permitting timeline for projects.

The effort will involve AWEA, offshore wind developers, and other stakeholders in states such as Maine, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, Michigan, Illinois and Ohio.

Bode said, “Offshore wind energy is proven in Europe, and will soon be hard at work here in America, powering our economy, protecting our environment, and creating jobs.”

In June, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar and the governors of 10 East Coast states signed a Memorandum of Understanding that formally establishes an Atlantic Offshore Wind Energy Consortium to promote the efficient, orderly, and responsible development of wind resources on the Outer Continental Shelf.

On April 21, the federal government approved Cape Wind, a 130-turbine wind power project in Nantucket Sound off the Massachusetts coast that is the nation’s first approved offshore wind development.

A public-private partnership in New York State is developing a 350-megawatt offshore wind project. The Long Island – New York City Offshore Wind Project would be located about 13 nautical miles off the Rockaway Peninsula in the New York City borough of Queens.

The New York Power Authority now is reviewing five proposals from wind developers to build offshore wind turbines in lakes Ontario or Erie. Lawmakers in some lakeside counties have expressed opposition.

In addition, NRG Bluewater Wind has proposed wind power projects off the coasts of Delaware, Maryland, and New Jersey; and Deepwater Wind is involved with projects off the coasts of Rhode Island and New Jersey.

On August 19, New Jersey Governor Chris Christie signed into law the most comprehensive legislation yet passed by a state to support the development of offshore wind energy. The Offshore Wind Economic Development Act directs the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities to develop and establish an offshore wind renewable energy certificate program that requires a percentage of electricity sold in the state to be from offshore wind energy.

There have been some setbacks. On August 20, Duke Energy announced the cancellation of plans to develop a three-turbine offshore wind demonstration project in a lagoon in North Carolina’s Pamlico Sound. Duke blamed high costs and greater than expected environmental impacts.

Nevertheless, the U.S. Department of Energy estimates that of the 300,000 MW of wind power that could generate 20 percent of U.S. electricity in 20 years, 50,000 MW would likely be offshore.

Fuente:

http://www.ens-newswire.com/ens/sep2010/2010-09-14-091.html





Energías Renovables en EE.UU analizando cada Estado.

16 09 2010

Markets, Economic Development and Policy in the 50 States

Renewable Energy in America is intended to provide decision-makers an executive summary on the status of renewable energy implementation at the state-level. The report provides a two-page, high-level overview on the key developments that have shaped the renewable energy landscape in each state, including information on installed and planned capacity, markets, economic development, resource potential and policy.

The report is a “living” document that will continue to evolve with updates and periodic revision. It is ACORE’s intention to update each state profile quarterly.

View the full PDF report (updated August 2010)

Más información en:

http://www.acore.org/publications/50states





    Premiarán a los vecinos que utilicen energías renovables

    9 09 2010

    Artículo publicada en ambitoweb el 9 de septiembre de 2010





    Desiccant-Enhanced eVaporative air conditioner.

    6 07 2010

    Aunque recien empezado el invierno en el hemisferio sur, la otra mitad del planeta se prepara para las altas temperaturas. Algunos días atrás, se publicó un concepto revolucionario de refrigeración que consume entre 50 y 90 por ciento menos energía que los aparatos de aire acondicionado más eficientes existentes en la actualidad. A título informativo, el porcentaje de energía dedicada a refrigeración en un país como Estados Unidos asciende al 5 por ciento de toda la energía consumida en el territorio.

    Esta vez el desarrollo provino de un organismo público, el Laboratorio Nacional de Energías Renovables del Departamento de Energía de los Estados Unidos, NREL . Este nuevo sistema utiliza de manera novedosa membranas, enfriamiento por evaporación y desecantes líquidos, contrariamente a los sistemas tradicionales con compresores que existen desde hace casi un siglo. “La idea es revolucionar el enfriamiento quitando al mismo tiempo millones de toneladas de CO2 del aire” declaró el ingeniero mecánico Eric Kozubal, co-inventor del concepto que llamó DEVap, del inglés Desiccant-Enhanced eVaporative air conditioner.

    Eric Kozubal examina un prototipo de sistema de circulación de aireFoto: Gentileza NREL

    El enfriamiento por evaporación no es un concepto novedoso, ya se viene utilizando exitosamente en algunas zonas secas como los desiertos desde hace muchos años. El sistema consiste en hacer circular aire a través de una superficie mojada para provocar la evaporación. Con el tiempo, el método fue mejorado, bajo el nombre de enfriamiento evaporativo indirecto, incorporando una membrana de polímero separando el flujo de aire en dos corrientes aisladas. Una de las dos corrientes es atravesada por agua, enfriándola y agregándole a su vez humedad. Este aire más fresco y húmedo baja la temperatura de la membrana que a su vez enfría la segunda corriente de aire pero esta vez sin agregarle humedad. Sin embargo, el aire solo puede contener cantidades limitadas de vapor de agua y por lo tanto en climas húmedos el efecto es mucho más limitado.

    De allí surje el mayor problema de los sistemas de aire acondicionado por evaporación: funcionan bien únicamente en climas secos y agregan humedad al aire frío suministrado. El DEVap resuelve este desafío al agregar una etapa adicional al comienzo del proceso, que consiste en circular el aire a través de desecantes líquidos que quitan la humedad del aire enfriado. El tipo de desecante utilizado es parecido a un sirope que contiene sales como cloruro de litio o cloruro de calcio en un 44 por ciento en volumen.

    Ambas sustancias son consideradas inofensivas, el cloruro de calcio se utiliza como sal para derretir la nieve en países nórdicos aunque es altamente corrosivo y no puede estar en contacto con piezas metálicas. En este nuevo sistema, otra membrana separa el desecante del aire que viaja a través del canal. La membrana de polímero tiene poros de entre 1 y 3 micrones de diámetro, lo suficientemente grandes para que el vapor de agua los atreviese fácilmente mientras que la solución salina (sirope) se mantenga en el lugar. El desecante quita humedad del aire generando aire cálido pero seco. Con este aire se inicia entonces el ciclo tradicional de enfriamiento evaporativo indirecto.

    El desecante se puede reutilizar calentando la solución a punto de ebullición y evaporando toda el agua. En una fábrica, este proceso se puede lograr aprovechando el calor desperdiciado de un proceso industrial mientras que en una casa se puede obtener quemando gas natural o mejor aún, a través de la energía solar térmica. De esta manera se puede aprovechar y reducir el período de amortización de un calefón solar para agua caliente utilizándolo también en verano para asistir con el aire acondicionado.

    Diagrama de funcionamiento (Traducción Sustentator.com)Foto: Gentileza NREL

    A nivel ambiental, el ahorro de emisiones de CO2 (dependiendo de la matriz energética de cada país) es la principal ventaja de DEVap aunque no la única. Dado que funciona con soluciones salinas en vez de refrigerantes; no se utilizan los clásicos clorofluorocarbonos (CFC) o hidroclorofluorocarbonos (HCFC).

    Un kilogramo de CFC o HCFC contribuye tanto al cambio climático como 2000 kilogramos de CO2 y una instalación domiciliaria tipo contiene 6 kilos de uno de estos gases. Si bien este nuevo sistema no es sustancialmente novedoso, según NREL, es una de las primeras soluciones viables a nivel económico para enfriar edificios y casas residenciales. Se estima que la tecnología estará disponible comercialmente en 5 años y se está diseñando para poder adaptar instalaciones de aire acondicionado existentes sin realizar demasiadas modificaciones.

    Fuente:

    Por Rodrigo Herrera Vegas
    Para lanacion.com

    Link: http://www.lanacion.com.ar/nota.asp?nota_id=1281866





    El primer edificio público ecológico

    30 05 2010

    San Luis: se trata del primer edificio público ecológico de la Argentina.

    Y será nada más y nada menos que el edificio en el que estará el gobierno de la provincia. Alojará unos 2000 empleados. ”La nueva casa de gobierno será el primer edifico público ecológico que contará con un sistema de iluminación inteligente, aberturas de doble vidriado hermético (DVH), equipos de aire acondicionado de última generación, reciclaje de residuos, planta de tratamiento de agua y la forestación con especies nativas“, indicaron en el gobierno.

    Según el detalle que me enviaron, también dispondrán de vehículos eléctricos para hacer más eficiente el transporte y dispondrán de una capacitación permanente para el personal. Les quería mostrar esta iniciativa porque, más allá de los colores políticos, me parece interesante que se piensen desde los escritorios oficiales proyectos de este tipo.

    Fotos:

    http://blogs.lanacion.com.ar/ecologico/el-ambiente-en-general/el-primer-edificio-publico-ecologico/





    Green Building en Buenos Aires

    1 05 2010

    El concepto de sustentabilidad en la construcción llegó a Buenos Aires. Ya hay más de una veintena de edificios que cumplieron con los primeros pasos de certificación de green building y hay varios más en proyecto. Para conocer más acerca del tema entrevisté Carlos Grinberg, presidente de Argentina Green Building Council , una organización que asesora, difunde y aconseja a todo aquel que quiera realizar una construcción sostenible. ¿Por qué son sustentables estas construcciones? ¿Quién lo certifica? ¿Dónde están los edificios?

    Madero Office

    Aquí va buena parte de lo que me respondió: “Los edificios sustentables buscan minimizar su impacto sobre el medio ambiente durante su construcción, su uso, y al finalizar su ciclo de vida.  Se trata de reducir (o si fuera posible, eliminar) su huella ecológica. Por otro lado, una construcción sustentable debería contribuir de manera positiva al ambiente social del cual participa, respondiendo a las necesidades de sus usuarios, y mejorando su estado psicológico y físico”, explicó el ingeniero.

    • Se busca reducir el consumo energético (para acondicionamiento térmico e iluminación, entre otros) y de agua potable (para usos sanitarios, de acondicionamiento, y para riego), moderando el uso de materiales y recursos, e incorporando fuentes de energía renovable.
    • Acompañado del uso de materiales y de soluciones técnicas que beneficien al usuario en cuanto a las condiciones interiores de confort, buscando una mejor calidad del aire interior, un mayor acceso a luz natural y visuales, ventilación natural, etc.
    • La sustentabilidad está relacionada con criterios a nivel global, somo ser, la reducción en el uso de transporte (y por ende en la emisión de gases de efecto invernadero) a través del uso de tranporte público o de la búsqueda de materiales regionales,  priorizar la educación a todo nivel, y promover el reciclado, de residuos, de materiales, etc.

    Sobre la certificación de la construcción verde Grinberg indicó: “Existen organismos privados como el USGBC (US Green Building Council) que ha desarrollado un estandar sustentable denominado LEED (Liderazgo en Energía y Diseño Ambiental) que mide el grado de cumplimiento de estas acciones  durante la construcción de un edificio. En el mundo, los sistemas de certificación son muchos y cada uno está regulado por otra entidad.  Casbee en Japón, Green Star en Australia, y BREEAM en el Reino Unido son sólo algunos de ellos.  Otros países (en especial países europeos) incorporar nociones claves de sustentabilidad y ahorro energético a sus códigos de edificación, y su cumplimiento es obligatorio. Los sistemas de certificación mencionados funcionan sobre un sistema de puntos.  De acuerdo a las distintas estrategias adoptadas, se alcanza un cierto puntaje según el cuál un proyecto es considerado sustentable. Según el puntaje final, se le otorga al edificio una certificación que refleja el nivel de compromiso adoptado. Para la normativa LEED, los niveles son 4: Certificado, Plata, Oro, y Platino“.

    ¿Es más caro construir verde? Esta fue la respuesta del experto: “Lógicamente, el ser sustentable implica una serie de medidas de ahorro energético y de recursos. Estados Unidos, donde ya hay suficiente experiencia con edificios certificados bajo la norma LEED, se estima que un edificio que alcanza el nivel Certificado requiere una inversión inicial un 0,66% mayor; mientras que un edificio que alcanza el nivel Platino representa un incremento de 6,8% en su costo. En la Argentina, estos valores aún no están claros aunque estimamos que son mayores aunque irán disminuyendo a medida que el mercado comprenda las implicancias de construir de manera más responsable”.

    “En el país se ve, predominantemente, edificios que buscan la certificación LEED. La Argentina no cuenta aún con un sistema de certificación local, que refleje directamente la realidad del mercado de la construcción en nuestro país. Es por eso que desarrolladores y propietarios se han volcado a certificaciones extranjeras que ya cuentan con peso propio en el mundo entero. Actualmente existen más de 20 proyectos en proceso de certificación LEED, que se encuentran en distintas etapas de certificación. En 2009 se pre-certificó en nivel Plata el primer edificio en la Argentina, una torre de oficinas en Puerto Madero: Madero Office. La pre-certificación reconoce el compromiso del equipo con lograr la certificación LEED. El proyecto está ahora en proceso de certificación”, detalló el ingeniero.

    Madero Office

    Aquí va buena parte de lo que me respondió: “Los edificios sustentables buscan minimizar su impacto sobre el medio ambiente durante su construcción, su uso, y al finalizar su ciclo de vida.  Se trata de reducir (o si fuera posible, eliminar) su huella ecológica. Por otro lado, una construcción sustentable debería contribuir de manera positiva al ambiente social del cual participa, respondiendo a las necesidades de sus usuarios, y mejorando su estado psicológico y físico”, explicó el ingeniero.

    • Se busca reducir el consumo energético (para acondicionamiento térmico e iluminación, entre otros) y de agua potable (para usos sanitarios, de acondicionamiento, y para riego), moderando el uso de materiales y recursos, e incorporando fuentes de energía renovable.
    • Acompañado del uso de materiales y de soluciones técnicas que beneficien al usuario en cuanto a las condiciones interiores de confort, buscando una mejor calidad del aire interior, un mayor acceso a luz natural y visuales, ventilación natural, etc.
    • La sustentabilidad está relacionada con criterios a nivel global, somo ser, la reducción en el uso de transporte (y por ende en la emisión de gases de efecto invernadero) a través del uso de tranporte público o de la búsqueda de materiales regionales,  priorizar la educación a todo nivel, y promover el reciclado, de residuos, de materiales, etc.







    Seguir

    Recibe cada nueva publicación en tu buzón de correo electrónico.

    Únete a otros 219 seguidores

    A %d blogueros les gusta esto: